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TELEVISION TIDBITS WORTH WATCHING

The narrowing of boundaries between theatre and home viewing is a positive controversy; nothing beats the darkened, enclosed enchantment of the theatre, but television affords exposure and participation by those whose time, lives might be stymied by uncontrolled situations; choice breeds inclusiveness; entertainment touching vast numbers in universal spheres. Here are, not just films, but a streaming series, available to ... Read More »

STAR WARS: THE RISE OF SKYWALKER

Since 1977, “filmites” have been invested in a “galaxy, far, far away” and have experienced a franchise that has grown exponentially through the decades; director J.J. Abrams complication of past scenarios is “out of this world” to view, tweaked historical references infused with present digitalization enhancement, lend freshness to an inflated, fantastical tale; protagonists and antagonists have died, their progeny ... Read More »

UNCUT GEMS

Valium inducing, emotionally pulverizing, “Uncut Gems” sears to the soul one man’s addiction to living on the edge, a gambler, constantly questing the ultimate high, pushing to lethal limits his megalomania; Adam Sandler, like Sacha Baron Cohen in “The Spy”, switches oeuvres, and stuns as “Howard Ratner”, a jeweler, in possession of a stone of such magnitude, he is willing ... Read More »

1917

Writer/director Sam Mendes’s visual, fictionalized account  of a WW1 incident told to him by his grandfather, Alfred Mendes; “1917” differs from traditional “war” films in its intimacy; two British corporals sent on a death-defying mission, through still volatile, vacated enemy lines, to cauterize an attack by an ally battalion, an attack, orchestrated by the Germans, risking the lives of 1,600 ... Read More »

LITTLE WOMEN

This spirited fourth major film adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s (1832-1888) seminal “Little Women” (1868) is a refreshing, feisty, revamping of a tale that has everlasting appeal; its timelessness touching imaginations, one generation after another; director Greta Gerwig’s contemporary interpretation resonates with the pungency of twenty-first-century resolve adorned in the accoutrements of the nineteenth century; Concord, Massachusetts; severity of the ... Read More »

THE “CATS” CONUNDRUM

“Cats” debuted in London,1981; based upon T. S. Eliot’s 1939  “Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats” composer Andrew Lloyd Webber, with Merlin magic, stupefied audiences with his innovative, anthropomorphic felines; it was a sensation that captured the imaginations of theater goers throughout the world and continues to do so, even today, with this uneven production by Academy Award winning director ... Read More »

A HIDDEN LIFE

Writer/auteur Terrence Malick, has superlatively, with fecund imagination, blessed audiences with a masterpiece simmering in sacredness; a marriage of such profundity, depth, it transcends description; an aesthete, Franz Jaggerstatter (August Diehl) marries Fani (Valerie Pachner), a woman whose every fiber is matched dreamily with her husband; peasant farmers, in the Elysian, pastoral fields of Austria; twentieth- century madness of WWII ... Read More »

BOMBSHELL

After seeing Showtime’s “The Loudest Voice”, starring a pneumatic Russell Crowe, as Predator Poster Boy, Roger Ailes, Founder and CEO of Fox News; “Bombshell’s” repetitive version holds minimal surprises, just subtle analysis of the same scenario; top notch performances by Charlize Theron as Megyn Kelly’s clone; Nicole Kidman as the impetus (bombshell) Gretchen Carlson, signaling the demise of the bovine ... Read More »

A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

If you missed 2018’s “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?”, (reviewed 7/4/18) joyously heartfelt documentary featuring the blessed Fred Rogers (1928-2003) directed by Morgan Neville, “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”  will satiate your wonderment of a man whose goodness surged from his every pore; director Marielle Heller, without compromising Mr. Rogers mystique, concentrates on his empathetic skill to disinfect more ... Read More »

RICHARD JEWELL

Flannery O’Connor’s “A Good Man is Hard to Find” was pungently resonating watching Clint Eastwoods’s biopic of the treacherous treatment of Richard Jewell, a thirty-three-year-old security guard who discovered a bomb, in 1996’s Centennial Olympic Park, Atlanta, Georgia; saving countless, his fate twisted, screaming that “no good deed goes unpunished”, the F.B.I. and the media target him as the prime ... Read More »

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